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Graduate Entry (Bachelor/Master of Nursing) - Advice

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Author Graduate Entry (Bachelor/Master of Nursing) - Advice

T- rex

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  • Joined: Jun 2011
  • Location: Sydney
  • Posts: 7

Wed Jun 08, 2011 11:06 pm

Hi All,

I'm a newbie here and would really appreciate advice on whether the chances of me being eligible for graduate entry are realistic or just pie-in-the-sky,..

I'm currently living and working in the UK but will be back in Sydney (permanently) within the next 20 months. I qualified in The Netherlands as an Optometrist in 1998. Shortly after graduating I moved to the UK where I've been working as a fully registered Optom ever since. I have however always considered Nursing due to its diverse opportunities and the need I seem to have to work with people in a caring field.

Exploring various websites including uni's offering courses I note (to my dismay), that my previous degree is considered too old (as it is over 10 yrs old). BTW I've already had my Optom degree and transcript professionally translated and it has been assessed by NOOSR as being comparable to an Aussie Bachelor's Degree.

Although I have not engaged in any further post-grad education since gaining my degree in 1998 - the very nature of possessing a vocational degree in a profession such as optometry means that I have had to complete annual continuing education training (CET) modules in order to remain registered and up to date.

My question really is: would the fact that I can prove that I have consistently worked within my original profession, with the addition of these CET points since graduation till the time that I apply for my Nursing course enable me to convince the faculty that I am a 'good risk' to complete the course successfully??

Secondly,(although English is my 1st language) since I have obviously completed a degree course in a foreign language would I need to prove my command of English on admission, or would proof that I have completed my primary and secondary school education be enough to be exempt from an IELTS exam??

Thirdly, as I am a Kiwi and not an Aussie would I be subject to the international costs of the course, rather than the domestic fee - and if as a Kiwi I do qualify for the domestic fee, would part of the fee be covered by the commonwealth placed provision?? I do have time to save for the complete costs, and am fully prepared to do so but obviously if there's any discount - it would be nice, ay?

Cheers,

T- rex

Schizo

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  • Joined: Jan 2009
  • Location:
  • Posts: 239

Jun 12, 2011, 05:23 am Last edited Jun 12, 2011, 05:23 am update #2

T_rex, at your suggestion, I searched your post and YES, you have posted in the wrong UNIVERSE...LOL. Sorry for taking a cheap shot at you....but it was funny whilst it lasted.

Whether you qualify for domestic fees, you will have to check with Unis. Your registration, post graduation is with AHPRA (Australian Health Professional Registration Authority...or something like that). You should not have any problems. They main bone of contention is that you must have completed your year 12 in English in a commonwealth country. But bear in mind AHPRA is in a mess and can interpret things on either side on the line.

You should have no problems getting into an graduate entry program..just show that you have worked as an Opto for all these years, I am in the same boat...my accounting degree expired so many years ago that it has more wrinkles than me!!!

Do choose a good Uni because post graduation and for someone without nursing experience...it can be a BIG uphill climb but a well recognized degree from a reputable Uni can make or break your entry. Once you have experience under your belt, you'll be able to move around easily. I plan to buy a caravan and hitch up for long hauls around the country doing contract nursing work whilst touring. So that i won;t bleed $$$ from my savings...LOL. Just a side note...because of the GFC, a lot of retiring nurses did not retire and many on part time started doing full time to supplement for partner's lost job. Due to this and an influx of overseas recruited nurses (happened as a lag between recruitment time and the falling of the GFC axe), positions for nurse nowadays are mainly for those with experience. So, whilst they say there's a shortage, they meant shortage of experience nurses. For a graduation student the process is as follows - 3 months before final graduation..you will be invited to submit an application to various government and private hospitals to join their graduate nurse program (GNP). This is usually the major port of call for graduating nurses. however as mentioned earlier, due to GFC and skill mix ratio, the number of GNP positions are very limited. All the more in major cities, where no body wants to leave the big lights and attractions to work in regional australia. Well don;t be surprised that there will be 1,000 students vying for 6 positions...remember there are also lots of graduating students from other Unis!!! So the numbers applying is mind boggling. There's disadvantages of going regional, your learning curve can be severely restricted but the odds of gaining employment is better. GNPs are important because >80% of placements are via this program..Its unusual to gain employment as an RN straight up without experience. Some hospitals have a policy that prohibits employing RN without at least 1 year experience...hence the chicken and egg situation for many. I am a product of those who DID NOT gain an offer for a GNP position. I got an offer because during clinical placements as a student I did well in that ward and made known my wish to return once I graduated. i also picked out some potentially fatal arrhythmia from a patient's ECG reading and that put in me good contention for post graduate employment....lucky me...lol.

I believe that in nursing, self directed learning can make a lot of difference in your personal growth. My area of specialty is in cardiac sciences...Ecg interpretation and etc etc. So often I see students who come into our ward for training, especially the ones in final placements...not thinking beyond medication orders or protocols. They don't query WHY!? So to stir them up, I always ask them...why is this patient on Metoprolol and another is on Sotalol (both beta Blockers)...and usually they give the generic answer which is partially correct but goes no where. Then I torture them to go back and do their homework. Many come back without an answer...very sad. Whilst both are beta blockers, sotalol is used primarily as an anti-arryhtmic medications for atrial fribillation which has nothing to do with it beta receptor blockade properties. However it can cause long QT which can potentiate fatal rhythms. Anyways..sorry for carrying on,.... I just love my work too much..sigh

modified: Sunday 12 June 2011 5:40:26 am - Schizo

Yogi

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  • Joined: Aug 2011
  • Location:
  • Posts: 2

Aug 22, 2011, 04:33 pm

Hi Schizo - just wanted to say I have benefited much from your posts. I was just accepted as a "mature" aged student into Sydney Uni's master of nursing program, and have learned a lot from the various attitudes that lay behind the posts in this forum. I hope that I may come to hold an attitude towards early career nursing and job hunting that resembles yours. keep on keepin on.

T- rex

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  • Joined: Jun 2011
  • Location: Sydney
  • Posts: 7

Aug 23, 2011, 02:56 am

T- rex

(offline)

  • Joined: Jun 2011
  • Location: Sydney
  • Posts: 7

Aug 23, 2011, 03:13 am

Oops,..submitted too soon (IT Mong!)

Dear Yogi and Schizo,

Yes I agree with you Yogi. Schizo's posts have been well written and highly informative to anyone considering nursing as a profession - maybe he should be considered for an executive role on this site?

A question for you Yogi - as you have managed to procure yourself a place as a mature aged student on the masters (grad entry) nursing course at Sydney.

I will be applying for this as well, hopefully submitting my online application for either 2013/2014 enrolement as I will be back in Sydney by early 2013 (living working in UK).

I am 44 now (sob!), have an optometry degree and been working in the same field since graduation (1998). I have had email correspondence with Sydney University about entry requirements etc as my degree is over 10 yrs old - and have had some semi-positive feedback as to whether I will be allowed the grad entry route with a 1998 record.

As you are fortunate enough to have gained a place at Sydney,.. please please could you give me any helpful information or tips on how you sorted your application and your circumstances etc and if you've already started the course - your honest opinion on current experience and other info such as the vaccine/immunisation requirements - how long they take etc etc,..

I would be most appreciative for any info etc and will even buy you a box of chockies if we ever meet!

Ta muchly,

T- rex