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Author Any rural nurses out there?

kerry

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kerry

  • Joined: Jun 2005
  • Location:
  • Posts: 13

Wed Jul 20, 2005 8:07 am

Hello,

I am a student nurse and want to go rural after I graduate.  I thought this might be a good forum to run into some other rural RN's, but where are they?

Is having an forum on the internet not worth the time, are you too busy or do rural nurses just not know about this site?

Hope to hear form someone soon,

kerry

Deb

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Deb
  • Joined: Jun 2005
  • Location:
  • Posts: 6

Jul 20, 2005, 02:41 pm

Hi Kerry

Nice to hear you are thinking of going rural as it is difficult to recruit and retain in rural areas. Many of us have been out here a long time and are unlikely to move (it is difficult to pick up 1000 acres and move on!!), thus having new and fresh ideas brought into the workplace is a pleasant change. As a rural nurse you would be a registered GENERAL nurse in the true sense. In one shift you may be a recovery nurse, a surgical nurse, a medical nurse, a cardiac nurse, a midwife, a mental health nurse and so the list goes on. It is challenging and, I believe, quite misunderstood by our metro counterparts who tend to specialise in one area. We are like GPs, we know a little bit about lots of things. There are many rural regions setting up GNP programs so you may like to look into that. Good luck and I hope to see your fresh face and ideas around the rural traps!!

Deb

red

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red
  • Joined: Jun 2005
  • Location:
  • Posts: 10

Aug 05, 2005, 04:04 pm

HI

I ama rural nurse & I guess a lot of the time... we dont have time... hours to get to work, hours to get home, not a lot of wweb access, farms to run... its a busy lifestyle.. but can be rewarding.

Michael

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G'day
  • Joined: Aug 2005
  • Location: Ceduna
  • Posts: 5

Aug 09, 2005, 08:46 pm

Hi Kerry,Im another rural/remote nurse, so far it has provided me with many opportunitues/choices and autonomy not to be found in the metro area, and the nursing is great too!Are there any country nurses out there considering or interested in bvecoming a nurse practitioner or would like to know more about it, or discuss its position in the health care team in the bush or city.I know the GP's are pretty opposed to it in most areas, Any comments?Michael

red

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red
  • Joined: Jun 2005
  • Location:
  • Posts: 10

Aug 16, 2005, 06:55 pm

as a rural nurse, there are a few routes to take - management, and if you're in a large rural centre nurse specialist or consultant (in NSW). but dont hod your breath, they're few & far between outside the base hospitals. other than that its being the best RN  or EN or AIN you can be. And that can be rewarding in itself.  

Larns

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Larns
  • Joined: Sep 2005
  • Location: Blackwater
  • Posts: 2

Sep 27, 2005, 10:18 am

Hi, This is my first post so excuse me if I do anything wrong. I am a rural nurse but not in a hospital, I work in an Aboriginal Medical Service, and while we are classed as rural, we aren't really isolated. Although it often feels like it. I guess time is the hugest factor for me as well as the lack of services. I was a metro nurse a year ago and then moved to greener pastures and a slower pace of life, or so I thought. I have found it a wonderful experience although filled with daily challenges.

belle

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  • Joined: Feb 2006
  • Location:
  • Posts: 2

Feb 06, 2006, 11:16 pm

Hi, this is my first post, so please excuse. I have worked in many areas as both an RN and and EN. My graduate year was in a small rural 12 bed hospital and was a nightmare. I was so innocent, and the staff had very strong personalities with no education or support from management. Subsequent places have been really interesting and I have gone on to postgraduate study. I think it is important to pick your hospital carefully and be careful to stay out of workplace politics initially. I wish I had done a graduate programme at a large hospital prior to working in a rural area, as this would have given me a broader overview. Emergency Department or critical care experience/knowledge also helps as you get a lot of chest pain and farming/road accidents in rural areas. Now that I am 11 years out, I love the autonomy and being able to use all of my assessment skills in an amazing variety of situations. I have seen trauma, disaster plans in action, births, theatre, cardiac arrests, done ambulance transfers of critical patients to the nearest tertiary centre, triaged, looked after the very young and old, palliative care and much more. All with great satisfaction. Good luck on your adventures as an RN.

Shaun

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  • Joined: Apr 2006
  • Location: Wallaroo
  • Posts: 2

Apr 22, 2006, 09:00 pm

Hi all,

I am also a nursing student studying fulltime as an external student from the Whyalla campus of Unisa, and working a fulltime job in a non related industry.The Whyalla campus has a rural focus that I hope will help me when qualified and working in a rural area. I would like to know from any experienced RN's how important choosing the right sites for clinical placement is. Belle, you mentioned that you would have liked to do your GNP in a metro hospital, do you think that this would have prepared you better for practice as a rural RN? I am currently in second year and have chosen my placements in the metro area as I feel I will get to see many of the same things over and over again allowing me to develop and gain some of the skills I will need when qualified. I was worried that due to the large variety of work seen in a rural location it may not allow me to see the same thing many times over and will not give me the opportunity to practice and become competent at many of the skills I will need to be able to use in rural practice. As our clinical experiences are limited it is difficult, with so many choices, to decide on what types of wards my placements sould be taken. I would like to think that the ones I do chose will be of use to me later when working in country areas. Any thoughts on this would be appriciated.

Regards, Shaun.

nursemorgan

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  • Joined: Jul 2005
  • Location: adelaide
  • Posts: 28

May 29, 2006, 05:34 pm

Hi Shaun

I am at same uni as you only in the city. So far I have done only country placements. Pinnaroo hospital, Port Augusta Emergency department (also handles out pt stuff) and whyalla general medical.

It becomes very obvious during group debriefings that those students who do city placements, predominatley in specialty area's learn a *lot about a little* where are those on country placements learn a *little about a lot*.

Also less nursing students/ medical students/ grad. nurses/ interns......to compete with meaning you do a lot more clinically ie taking blood, nasogastric tubes etc etc.

Cheers

Morgan

lys.is

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lys.is
  • Joined: Sep 2007
  • Location: Armidale
  • Posts: 9

Sep 07, 2007, 03:22 pm

Hi! Im from rural NSW and have recently moved away to study nursing at Armidale. I have, however, done both of my pracs in rural areas (Moree & Coonamble) and loved them both! Im not too sure if I'll go back to rural areas when I finish my degree as Id like to work in Acute Nursing but coming back to smaller places to work has definately been an eye opener for me and I would suggest people to take the opportunity!

gabrielpet

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  • Joined: May 2008
  • Location: Melbourne, Australia
  • Posts: 2

May 06, 2008, 08:30 am

You see Kerry what it is all about is rural versus city. The rural is going to the city and the city is going to the .... who knows but believe me, they have gone. Don't go with them. Go where you choose to go. Go where your heart leads. You have a head over your heart. What you need is the reverse. Think about sunshine, surf, friendly faces. That's the rural. The big city is pollution, traffic congestion, smelly places, yuk!!!

TanyaG

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  • Joined: Aug 2008
  • Location: Sunshine Coast
  • Posts: 2

Aug 04, 2008, 03:00 pm

Hi There,

I'm new to this site, and couldn't figure out how to message you all individually :)

I'm a student Enrolled Nurse, and I'm keen to head Rural for my placements, if possible ... I was hoping to maybe hear from some of you who are working 'out there' - where you are and how it is, and whether or not an Enrolled Nurse is useful Rurally (or are only RNs employed?) ... I'm in QLD, and would love to hear any stories, suggestions, etc!

Cheers :)

Tanya

su

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  • Joined: Sep 2008
  • Location:
  • Posts: 2

Sep 07, 2008, 09:20 pm

hello, I am going to ak the same question?

Iam studying an EN (med) qualification in queensland have any of you worked with a EEN in a remote setting?

I had a report from a teacher that a EN from darwin was a great co worker because of her experiences as a remote nurse and she had advanced competencies.

She could say nothing but great things any one else had a similar experience?

marizandres

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  • Joined: Aug 2010
  • Location: Arizona
  • Posts: 12

Aug 20, 2010, 12:20 pm

I've been a nurse in a rural area and it's not bad at all.

richardluthar

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  • Joined: Jan 2012
  • Location: SDS
  • Posts: 1

Jan 17, 2012, 08:38 am

Hello, you are thinking of going rural as it is difficult to recruit and retain in rural areas of nurses student. The Nurses in rural areas are confronted with very different hospital and clinic cultures than urban nurses.

duaneconnell

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  • Joined: Oct 2013
  • Location:
  • Posts: 64

Sep 22, 2016, 04:44 am

It is worth it in being a rural nurse.  In fact, we need rural nurses in order to travel to nursing communities that are rural.  My friend is a nurse and she also lives in the rural areas.  She travels a lot to rural areas that do not have lots of people and she also does healthcare in those areas.  All of this is made possible by the traveling nursing van that takes the nurse to each rural area and do healthcare in the van.  This is very important because people in rural areas do not have access to healthcare and the van makes healthcare easily accessible.  I am so glad that there are van's available in the rural areas.

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